Energy and nutrient needs are best met by building intuitive eating skills/ being present while you eat, acknowledging hunger and satiety cues, and following a balanced plate guide for meals and snacks. This is a skill that we will work on together, I talked about the breakdown of meals (½ plate dark leafy greens and vibrant colored vegetables + ¼ plate lean protein + ¼ plate fiber-filled whole grain) and snacks (carbohydrate paired with a protein).


Stay vigilant about watching the way your body reacts to certain foods. Which foods do you feel immediately tired after eating? Which foods give you a spike of energy but a crash soon after? Which foods satiate you? Which type of foods do you reach for most often when you are stress? These foods have different effects on your blood glucose, either causing the levels to rise or fall and thus triggering hunger or satiety.

Make sure you are eating enough and find out your BMR. If it is not listed above and you would like me to calculate it, send me your height and current body weight).

***Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) represents the minimal calorie number you need for involuntary body functions; you shouldn't consume fewer calories than your BMR. To lose weight properly, you need to consider both physical activity and your BMR. Eating SIGNIFICANTLY LESS calories than your BMR (ie. “1200”) can LOWER YOUR METABOLISM. Regularly eating fewer calories than your body needs can cause your metabolism to slow down.

 

PAIRING SNACKS

 

Your blood sugar drops, or slowly decreases with time,

your brain receives the signal that it’s time to boost blood glucose,

your brain sends you looking for a snack with carbohydrates in it so that those carbs will break down into the glucose that your body needs.

You eat the carbohydrate- rich snack, your body digests it within 20-30 minutes, your blood sugar drops,

The cycle starts again….

Be sure to PAIR your snacks *a whole grain, vegetable, or fruit carbohydrate source + a protein*

The protein will slow down the absorption and digestion of the carbohydrate and will keep you satiated for 2-4 hours after that snack.

Macronutrients

CARBOHYDRATES and FAT:

BALANCING BLOOD SUGAR TO REDUCE CRAVINGS and non-sensical snacking.

 

Watch your SUGAR/ CARBOHYDRATE intake! INSULIN = the fat fertilizer.

Eating too many refined carbohydrates and simple sugars causes blood glucose to surge soon after a meal, which in turn makes the pancreas produce insulin. High insulin levels trigger fat cells to hoard excessive amounts of glucose, fatty acids, and other calorie-rich substances that circulate in the blood. Insulin ushers calories into fat cells but restricts their passage back out!

 

Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates.

 

Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry.

 

"Superfoods" to eat include fiber, vinegar, cinnamon, and berries.

High fiber carbohydrates like berries, flax and chia seed, oatmeal, apples and pears, lentils, and peas.

Vinegar is best consumed as vinaigrette dressing on your salad

Cinnamon lowers both fasting and after meals (postprandial) glucose. Try sprinkling cinnamon on cereal and toast, post workout shake, or in your coffee, tea, or cocoa, spread out over the day. Another option is to take cassia cinnamon in capsule form, taking 500 milligrams twice daily. Researchers found that cinnamon cut cholesterol by about 18% and blood sugar levels by 24%.

Berries are a surprise diabetes superfood. Even though they are sweet-tasting, berries have a well-balanced glycemic load of fiber to fructose. This means the benefits outweigh the harms of the added fructose and sugars.

 

  • The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended because it is full of nutrient-dense foods, including lots of fresh vegetables, some fruit, plant-fats such as olive oil and nuts, fish such as sardines, and occasional meat and dairy.

PROTEIN:

It’ll keep you satiated, curb any sweet or salty cravings you may have, and will help to build, repair, and maintain lean muscle mass. Get in as close to 25-30g EVERY meal you eat and at least 10-15 g at snacks.

LEANEST CUTS OF RED MEAT

Sirloin tip side steak: Calories 206; Fat 5.4g; Saturated Fat 2.06g; Protein 39g

Top round steak: Calories 240; Fat 7.6g; Saturated Fat 3g; Protein 36.9g

Eye of round steak: Calories 276; Fat 7g; Saturated Fat 2.4g; Protein 49.8g

Bottom round steak: Calories 300; Fat 11g; Saturated Fat 3.8; Protein 47.2g

Top Sirloin: Calories 316; Fat 10.6g; Saturated Fat 4g; Protein 51.6g

FIBER:

To keep you feeling fuller longer: Focus on Fiber!
You need 20-35 grams of soluble and insoluble fiber per day; attached is a resource on how increase your fiber intake.

High-fiber foods include:

  • Beans and legumes

  • Bran, whole wheat bread and whole grain cereals such as oatmeal

  • Brown and wild rice

  • Fruits such as apples, bananas and pears

  • Vegetables such as broccoli, carrots, corn and squash

Whole wheat pasta

FIBER:

To keep you feeling fuller longer: Focus on Fiber!
You need 20-35 grams of soluble and insoluble fiber per day; attached is a resource on how increase your fiber intake.

HYDRATION:

Approximately 60-80 ounces of fluid are needed for you to properly hydrate each day (“Five-ish” 20 oz water bottles). Remember, the better hydrated you are, the brighter your skin will look, the more regular your bathroom habits will be, and the less fatigue you will feel.

 
 

PORTION CONTROL
Protein: Full ‘top of the hand’ -size serving
Vegetables: ½ the meal
Fruits: Used to accent or enhance the flavor/ taste/ texture of the meal. Portion should be able to fit underneath your “tented” hand.
Whole Grains: Portion should be able to fit underneath your “tented” hand.
For snacking, consider purchasing pre-portioned foods to know how much you are consuming or buy the mini bags or the 100-calorie packs. Keep them in a place not out in the open but convenient for when you need a snack.

INTERMITTANT FASTING AND MINDFUL EATING


There are some serious benefits to time-restricted feeding aka intermittent fasting.
Mindful eating is an effective weight-loss strategy that encourages you to slow down and pay attention to your food, noticing each sip or bite you take. It helps focus your senses on exploring, savoring and tasting your food, and teaches you to follow hunger cues.
To reach the most beneficial fasted state, a decrease in the ‘eating window’ must take place. In the Happy Body Program, we use one week to shorten the window to 12 hours eating and then adapt to the 10-hour window in the following weeks.


A typical schedule looks like this:
Week 1: First Meal at 8am, Last Meal Before 8pm
Week 2-6: First Meal at 9 am, Last Meal Before 7 pm.

Failing to plan is planning to fail. Be prepared to combat random hunger.

 

PREPARED AN IN-CAR SNACK BOX!!!!!

A lot of mindless eating and “not so healthy” food choices can come when you’re hungry, racing around between home and work and don’t have food with you. PLEASE prepare either a plastic shoe box, container or bag full of shelf stable snacks.

 

My glove compartment is full of:

100 cal nut mix bags, high fiber granola bars, unsalted pretzels with single serving peanut butters, triscuit cracker single servings, turkey jerky, flavored tuna fish aluminum pouches, protein power bags + shelf stable mini- SILK milks (the ones that come in cardboard containers and don’t require refrigeration), single serving popcorns, single serving ADVANT-EDGE CARB CONTROL protein drinks, etc.

HEALTHIER ALTERNATIVES TO SWEET CHOCOLATES

Cacao nibs + peanuts

Dark Chocolate (at least >70% cacao)

Greek Yogurt topped with mini dark chocolate chips

Hot cocoa made with cocoa powder

Low sugar-high fiber peanut butter chocolate granola bar

Apple slices topped with peanut butter, coconut chips, and mini dark chocolate chips

Popcorn lightly dates with cocoa powder

Trail mix (popcorn, chocolate Chex cereal, dates, unsweetened coconut shreds, dried fruit, etc.)

MEAL PLANNING: MAKE IT EASIER on yourself and order from amazon prime whole foods and have it delivered every Sunday night. Stick with SIMPLE. Head to WHOLE FOODS when you get here on Sunday and pack your fridge with these options

 

CHOOSE 5 PROTEINS: Either order them to grill or bake or buy them from the ‘Chef’s Case’ already prepared. Chicken, ground turkey, white fish and shrimp, salmon, and pork loin/ chop.

 

CHOOSE 5 grains or beans/starchy veg (or 3 that you can repeat): They make 90 second microwave organic whole grains- get those for ease. Quinoa, Rice, Lentils, Buckwheat, Farro, Sweet potatoes, white potatoes.

 

CHOOSE 5 GREENS to STEAM or ROAST or buy them from the ‘Chef’s Case’ already prepared: Broccoli, Brussels, Spinach, Cauliflower, Mixed peppers, Asparagus, Green beans, Edamame, Lima beans.

 

Ex. Meatless Monday (beans, eggs, etc),

Ground Turkey Tuesday,

White Fish Wednesday,

Chicken Thursdays,

PIZZA (pick your own protein) Friday,

Shrimp Saturday,

Salmon Sunday!

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HEALTHY MEAL HOME DELIVERY, MEAL PLAN, SHOP FOR CONVEINENCE, and SHOP THE SALAD BAR.

  • Utilize the salad bar at grocery stores to stock up on ready-to-eat options you can utilize throughout the week. Consider choosing grilled meats, pre-cut fruit, mixed green salads for variations, and premade healthy vegetable and whole grains sides.

 

These are local companies that I recommend for healthy meal pick-up and/or delivery:

How to combat cravings for carbs and sugars (and boredom snacking)

 

Sweet foods and those rich in other carbohydrates fire off feel-good chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and other relaxing endorphins in the brain. The effects of these chemicals may make a person more likely to seek them out repeatedly.

 

Satisfying cravings can become a habit, and it may be easy to eat sugary or carbohydrate-rich foods without thinking about the consequences.

 

The strategies below can help with managing food cravings.

 

Drink Water

When a food craving strikes, try drinking a large glass of water and waiting a few minutes. If the craving goes away, the body may just have been thirsty.

 

Make Healthy Habits Choices Easier to Make and Unhealthy Habit Choices Harder to Make

Out of sight, out of mind. Don’t buy the non-so-nutritious foods, or* put them in a hard to reach place.

Buy pre-portioned, pre-packed healthy and nutritious foods. Put them in direct eye sight so you’re visually stimulated to choose them first when you see them (and not the unhealthy options).

Get up and move

The next time a craving hits, it may help to try taking a quick walk or using the stairs instead of the elevator.

 

Visualize the long-term consequences

These consequences may include:

  • difficulty losing weight

  • health risks

  • feeling reduced levels of energy and happiness throughout the day

This exercise can also help a person to see the big picture and remember why they are dieting or trying to restrict their intake of certain foods.

 

Finding ways to reduce stress may help to eliminate cravings.

Simple means of reducing stress, such as taking regular breaks from work, or even taking a few deep breaths, can help the body to refocus and calm the mind.

 

Eat protein!

Many people find that eating more protein helps to keep hunger pangs and cravings to a minimum.

Protein may help the body to feel more satisfied for longer.

 

Don’t skip meals

If a person feels hungry all the time, making certain dietary changes may help to curb sugar and carb cravings.

 

Eat The Damn Cookie

Sticking to a restrictive diet and ignoring cravings may be easier if a person has a planned indulgence to look forward to.

 

It is recommended that you:

 

Cardio conditioning should be performed for about 20 minutes a day, several days a week. The benefit of cardio exercises is the high number of calories burned. It is recommended that you exercise within 55 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate for at least 20 to 30 minutes to get the best results from aerobic exercise. If you have a Fitbit, Garmin or a heart rate monitor, try to monitor what it reads. If you aren’t entering that aerobic zone, then more cardio might be needed in your exercise routine. Cardio exercise is good for exactly what it sounds like “cardiovascular endurance

 

Strength training should be for about 20 minutes a day 2 days per week to build more and stronger muscle tone. The benefit of strength training is raising your metabolic rate (the number of calories you burn at rest).

HIGH INTENSITY AND SLOW AND STEADY FITNESS ARE NEEDED FOR WEIGHT CHANGES AND BODY COMPOSITION SHIFTS.

Stretch: After you’ve completed your workout, make sure you stretch. All your muscles have been contracted from lifting and need to be stretched back out and rebuilt.


Plan for and schedule in your workouts based on your forecasted weekly work load and social calendar. If morning workouts help you to start the day off fresh then get up and go!!!!
(Attached are recommendations on how you can that.)

***Remember that strength training will reduce adipose (fat) tissue and build lean muscle mass (and raise your resting metabolic rate) and that cardio will help you to burn off the fuel that you consume each day (in the form of carbohydrates).

INCREASE FREQUENCY AND FOCUS ON STRENGTH TRAINING


When you increase your muscle mass, you boost your resting metabolism -- and that makes your body burn more calories.

Every pound of muscle burns roughly six calories per day at rest.

Every pound of fat burns roughly two calories per day.

Why is that important? Well, if, for example, a woman adds 10 pounds of muscle and loses 10 pounds of fat, she'll burn 40 extra calories per day.


After a strength-training session, your metabolism stays elevated through a process called excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). EPOC is more commonly known as the afterburn effect. It refers to all of the oxygen (and energy, in the form of calories) that your body takes in and uses after exercise to help repair your muscles and recover. Research shows that strength training is especially effective at raising EPOC.

PRE-WORKOUT SNACK Recommendations

  • IF** snack is 60 to 90 minutes Before a Workout (35-40 grams of carbohydrate)
  • IF** snack is 30 to 60 Minutes Before a Workout (25 grams of carbohydrate)

  • IF** snack is 15 to 30 Minutes Before a Workout (15 grams carbohydrate)

Maximizing Muscle Synthesis: These are the supplements I recommend.

 

Remember that you don’t build muscle while you’re working out, you break it down. So it’s very important to consume post workout protein for recovery, maintenance and development of lean muscle.

POST-WORKOUT

Whey protein powder

How to maximize its effects: Take 20-30 grams- of whey protein powder within 30 minutes after training. Also, consider taking 20-30 grams of whey immediately upon waking every morning to kick-start muscle growth. Your best bet is to choose a whey powder that contains whey protein hydrolysates (whey protein broken down into smaller fragments for faster digestion) or whey protein isolate. 

Brands: Ascent Protein Powder, Garden of Life Sport Whey, NAKED Whey

AT NIGHT

Casein protein powder

Choose a casein protein that contains micellar casein (the slowest-digesting casein you can buy) and take 20-30 grams right before going to bed.

Brands: Ascent Protein Powder, NAKED Casein

WEIGH IN WEEKLY

One of your healthy intentions is weight loss. By changing your dietary intake and eating behaviors this should happen. When weighing yourself, remember that the scale is just a data point indication current body weight. It is NOT an indication of overall health and fitness level. The only thing you’re looking at is the number for is to be able to identify trends happening and progress.

CHOOSE FITNESS FORMATS THAT YOU ENJOY or CHANGE UP THE CARDIO MACHINES

 

Try switching it up to train different muscles;

5 minute uphill fast walk to warm up

7-10 minutes on the upright bike moderate resistance (not the recumbent)/ elliptical

5 minutes on the stair master/ rowing machine

5 minutes running as a “cool down”

2-3 minutes walking as cool down

IF YOU’RE SHORT ON TIME:

 

Here is a body weight exercise routine that you can do on your own at the gym or at your house. Do this routine 2-3 times a week, but try not to do it on consecutive days.  You don’t build muscle when you’re exercising, you build muscle when you’re recovering so post-workout nutrition (protein intake) is most important!  

  • 20 body weight squats

  • 10 push ups

  • 20 walking lunges

  • 10 dumbbell rows (using weights/ a gallon milk jug/ wine bottle/ soup cans)

  • 15 second plank

  • 30 Jumping Jacks

SAMPLE TOTAL BODY WORKOUT

Do this routine 2-3 times a week, but try not to do it on consecutive days.  You don’t build muscle when you’re exercising, you build muscle when you’re recovering so post-workout nutrition (protein intake) is most important!  

CHANGE UP THE TIME CAP as your progress.

Start with 15 minutes- work up to 20

Example: 

Five stations of 30 seconds each repeated for six circuits adds up to a 15-minute workout.

Five stations of 1-minute each repeated for six circuits adds up to a 30-minute workout.

Step 1: Warm Up (3 minutes of one of the following exercises)

Circuit 1: Jogging in place, Stationary Bike,
Circuit 2: Jumping rope
Circuit 3: Stair Jumping- hop up each step.
Circuit 4: Jumping Jacks
Circuit 5: Air Squats
Circuit 6: Stair climbing (in the house)

Step 2: Pick an upper-body exercise.

The trick with circuit training is to use whatever you have handy. If you're at the gym, you have a wide range of options—but all you really need is your body. You can choose a different upper-body move each round or simply repeat the same exercise every time if you want to keep things simple.

Example:
Circuit 1: Shoulder press
Circuit 2: Bent-over row
Circuit 3: Standing dumbbell curl
Circuit 4: Triceps dip
Circuit 5: Push-up
Circuit 6: Russian twist ab exercise with weight.

Step 3: Pick a lower-body exercise.

Just like you did with the upper body, choose exercises that will work each part of your lower body. You can change up the moves each round or keep them the same.

Example:
Circuit 1: Forward lunge or walking lunge
Circuit 2: Sumo squat
Circuit 3: Calf raise
Circuit 4: Hamstring curl on a Swiss ball
Circuit 5: Deadlift
Circuit 6: Superman

Step 4: Pick a compound exercise.

Weight training is an excellent workout, but you'll really get your heart rate up by adding in some total-body movements.

Example:
Circuit 1: Jumping lunge
Circuit 2: Mountain climbers
Circuit 3: Thruster (squat to shoulder press)
Circuit 4: Clean
Circuit 5: Bench hop-over
Circuit 6: Single-arm kettlebell swing

Step 5: Choose a sprint for 1 minute.

Research shows that short, fast sprints are the most effective way to torch fat—especially around your midsection. Pick any type of cardio you like and go all out for 1 minute.

Example:
Circuit 1: Running
Circuit 2: Jumping rope
Circuit 3: Rowing
Circuit 4: Cycling
Circuit 5: Up-hill jogging
Circuit 6: Stair climbing

Step 6: Rest for 1 minute.

 

ME TIME, WE TIME, US TIME.

Me Time: 5 minutes/ day

We Time: 1hr/ week with your significant other

Us Time: Quarterly Retreat

 

Recommendations for different types of stress management can be requested if you need some ideas.

 

Stress reduction works with sleep, physical activity, and diet to help your body’s natural hormone cycle stay on track. If you have trouble being consistent with the 5-minute stress reducing practice, experiment with a different method. You don’t have to sit cross-legged breathing in and out sounds of OMMMM. You can listen to tunes, take a short walk, read some inspirations and motivational quotes, or day dream about your wellness vision. The 5 minutes a day are supposed to be a way for you to disconnect from the frantic outside world and soothe your nervous system. No matter how busy the day, you need a few moments to yourself.

CORTISOL AND WEIGHT RETENTION.

It is extremely important to talk about cortisol, the stress hormone, and how it can affect hormonal shifts leading to energy fluctuations, anxiety, depression, mood swings, as well as weight gain, weight loss and maintenance.

 

  • we have more cortisol receptors in our abdominal adipose tissue than in other areas of fat storage! In other words, our bellies have four times more “doorways” for cortisol to act on our fat cells.

  • cortisol increases our blood sugar level temporarily, giving us quick energy to “fight-or-flight” the stressor at hand. Unfortunately, this rise is quickly followed by a blood sugar drop, which leaves us feeling tired, hangry (hungry and angry), craving sugar, and MORE STRESSED! Once in a low blood sugar state, cookies and donuts in the breakroom look way more appealing than the steak, green beans, and butter you brought for lunch



















    HOW TO LOWER CORTISOL LEVELS NATURALLY

  • Find some way to CHILL THE HECK OUT (deep breathing, massage, new job, new hobby, incense, meditation app, new clothes- retail therapy, change in routine)

  • Add the following vitamins and minerals to your regimen (or get from natural food sources)

  • o    Vitamin D (from foods or the sun – 10-15 minutes/ day without sunlight blocking SPF on)

  • o   CoQ10 and Vitamin B12 for a natural energy boost

  • o   Omega-3 (from oily fish such as salmon and avocados)

  • o   Magnesium (When you think magnesium, think relaxation: magnesium helps our bodies control blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, reduce anxiety, relax our muscles, promote sleep, and much more. 400-600mg of our Magnesium Glycinate or Mixed Magnesium products.)

  • Avoid or LIMIT inflammatory foods: refined carbohydrates, sugar, caffeine, alcohol, dairy (for some), gluten (for some)
     

Developing a strong, balanced, less fatigued physique; watch you SUGAR Intake! INSULIN = the fat fertilizer.

  • Eating too many refined carbohydrates and simple sugars causes blood glucose to surge soon after a meal, which in turn makes the pancreas produce insulin. High insulin levels trigger fat cells to hoard excessive amounts of glucose, fatty acids, and other calorie-rich substances that circulate in the blood. Insulin directs and ushers calories into fat cells but restricts their passage back out!

Stressful hormonal situations can wreak HAVOC on one’s body throwing our digestive systems out-of- whack, our cardiovascular system into working overtime, and cause our brains to malfunction producing higher doses of stress hormones perpetuating a terrible cycle. The unfortunate part of this process is that while the cause is located internally, the symptoms are observable from the outside!

ANXIETY (AND PANIC): EFFECTS AND COPING MECHANISMS

 

  • Panic attacks are an overreaction by the amygdala, or the fear center of the brain

  • Symptoms include a racing heart, sweating, difficulty catching breath, and a feeling of impending death or doom.

  • Twice as many women than men experience panic attacks.

  • Preparing calm breathing techniques and mindfulness strategies can help to keep panic attacks at bay.

 

Here are many excellent ways for people to self-manage panic reactions.

Education: It is vital to understand that the symptoms of panic are not associated with a serious illness. Despite the feelings of terror and sense of impending doom, an attack will not lead to death.

 

Calm breathing: Taking control of breathing is the first step to controlling a panic attack. The goal is to create a slow stream of air by breathing in and out. This prevents hyperventilation and a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood.

To practice calm breathing:
Take slow, regular breaths in through your nose, and then out through slightly puckered lips.

Breathe in for the count of five, hold for 1 second, and then exhale slowly to the count of four.

Pause for 2 seconds, and then repeat.

Repeat this for several cycles or until you feel the body start to calm down.

 

Muscle relaxation: This technique involves tensing and untensing various muscle groups. This lowers overall tension and stress levels that can contribute to panic attacks. Start with the feet and work up to your forehead.

Tighten the muscle while taking a deep breath in, hold for a few seconds and then release the tension while breathing out. Move up the body, one muscle group at a time.

Mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy: CBT is a helpful option for people who experience repeated panic attacks. CBT challenges fearful thoughts. What are you afraid will happen? Is there evidence to support these fears? A practitioner trained in CBT can equip an individual with the tools to successfully control and defuse a full-blown panic attack.

Exercise: Exercise helps with stress management and encourages the body to produces natural chemicals called endorphins that are vital for pain relief and a feeling of well-being. Regularly exercising in a social setting can also help improve a person's confidence and sense of community. This can minimize future triggers for panic attacks and foster a supportive network of people who can help if a panic attack does occur.

Planning ahead: Preparing for known triggers and stressful situations can be helpful. What is it about the situation that causes feelings of terror? If it is flying, for example, talk to a friend who loves to fly and ask what they enjoy about it. Maybe seek reassurance from a flight attendant.

Other methods that many people find helpful include:

  • finding ways to distract yourself, such as through music, movies, puzzles, or talking with friends.

  • dressing in layers or carrying a portable fan to avoid overheating

  • having water on hand to keep hydrated and cool

  • internalizing reassuring statements or mantras, such as "I am safe," "I can handle this," or "This too shall pass."

 

Eat a healthy diet: Eating regular meals can help maintain normal blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar levels can contribute to panic symptoms. A healthy diet involves:

  • never going more than 4 hours without eating

  • correcting any dietary deficiencies

  • avoiding caffeine and alcohol as they can trigger or worsen panic attacks

 

Complementary and alternative medicine: There is a growing interest in using alternative medicine interventions in the U.S. for both medical and anxiety related disorders. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, and some herbs may be an effective, helpful additional method of controlling panic.

9)Medication: Medication should not be used as initial management for panic attack symptoms. If all other measures have not helped, some drugs have been successful in controlling panic attacks. These include benzodiazepines and selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

INCREASE FREQUENCY AND FOCUS ON STRENGTH TRAINING


When you increase your muscle mass, you boost your resting metabolism -- and that makes your body burn more calories.

Every pound of muscle burns roughly six calories per day at rest.

Every pound of fat burns roughly two calories per day.

Why is that important? Well, if, for example, a woman adds 10 pounds of muscle and loses 10 pounds of fat, she'll burn 40 extra calories per day.


After a strength-training session, your metabolism stays elevated through a process called excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). EPOC is more commonly known as the afterburn effect. It refers to all of the oxygen (and energy, in the form of calories) that your body takes in and uses after exercise to help repair your muscles and recover. Research shows that strength training is especially effective at raising EPOC.

 

Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety.

 

The way you feel while you're awake depends in part on what happens while you're sleeping. During sleep, your body is working to support healthy brain function and maintain your physical health. In children and teens, sleep also helps support growth and development.

 

Keep track of your sleep and be aware of any changes as ongoing sleep deficiency can raise your risk for some chronic health problems. It also can affect how well you think, react, work, learn, and get along with others.

A desynchronization from natural rhythm and physiological rhythm (circadian rhythm) can offset your body’s biological clock and trigger any hormonal imbalances.

It can lead to problems with immune system function, blood sugar and lipid metabolism, intestinal mucosal integrity, bone metabolism, and influence neurological function to name but a few.

 

Naturally, the “wake up/ stress hormone” cortisol will be at its peak between 6 am and 8 am then decline to its lowest level between 6 pm and 8 pm.

Melatonin, the hormone produced at night, serves as a time cue to the biological clock and promotes sleep anticipation. It starts to increase around 8pm and peaks at 4am causing deep, restorative sleep.

 

First off, Take a look at the list below of nutritionally relevant tips for a better night’s sleep.

For some people, a light snack before bed can help promote sleep. When you pair tryptophan-containing foods with carbohydrates, it may help calm the brain and allow you to sleep better. For others, eating before bed can lead to indigestion and make sleeping more difficult. Experiment with your food habits to determine your optimum evening meals and snacks.

 

Try plant sources high in tryptophan including:

A handful of almonds

A banana

Honey

Edamame

Potato

Green Tea-decaffeinated

Oatmeal or Yogurt

 

Maintain a good sleep cycle will keep your natural hormone production to appropriate times.

 

Medical Nutrition Therapy: Lowering Cholesterol

Below are dietary Interventions and supplement recommendations to keep cholesterol levels low, to help keep you feeling fuller longer, stabilize your Blood Glucose, and manage underlying Hypertension.

 

  1. You need 35 grams of soluble and insoluble fiber per day; attached are ways to help you incorporate more dietary fiber into your diet.

  2. Psyllium supplement capsule every night.

  3. Fish oil.  Omega-3 fatty acids have been promoted to help lower triglyceride levels (take enteric-coated formulations or freezing the capsules may help reduce the “fishy” taste).

  4. Niacin (aka vitamin B3) supplement. This B vitamin can boost HDL “good" cholesterol and lower LDL “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides -- but only use it if your doctor advises you to.

Eat phytosterols daily. Phytosterols are waxes derived from plants. They prevent your intestines from absorbing cholesterol. They’re naturally present in whole grains, nuts, fruits, and vegetables.

(and to help keep you feeling fuller longer, stabilize your Blood Glucose, and manage underlying

 

Hypertension: Focus on Fiber)!

 

High-fiber foods include:

  • Beans and legumes

  • Bran, whole wheat bread and whole grain cereals such as oatmeal

  • Brown and wild rice

  • Fruits such as apples, bananas and pears

  • Vegetables such as broccoli, carrots, corn and squash

  • Whole wheat pasta

 

INCLUDE THESE FOODS IN YOUR DIET:

  • eggs: whole eggs are best, as much of their iodine and selenium are found in the yolk, while the whites are full of protein

  • meat: all meats, including lamb, beef, chicken, etc.

  • fish: all seafood, including salmon, tuna, halibut, shrimp, etc.

  • vegetables: all vegetables — cruciferous vegetables are fine to eat in moderate amounts, especially when cooked

  • fruits: all other fruits, including berries, bananas, oranges, tomatoes, etc.

  • gluten-free grains and seeds: rice, buckwheat, quinoa, chia seeds, and flax seeds

  • dairy: all dairy products, including milk, cheese, yogurt, etc.

  • beverages: water and other non-caffeinated beverages

AVOID/ LIMIT THESE FOODS (which are known as Goitrogens. These are compounds that may interfere with the normal function of the thyroid gland. They get their name from the term goiter, which is an enlarged thyroid gland that may occur with hypothyroidism. This is only a concern if you have iodine deficiency)

  • millet: all varieties

  • highly processed foods: hot dogs, cakes, cookies, etc.

  • soy-based foods: tofu, tempeh, edamame beans, soy milk, etc.

  • cruciferous vegetables: broccoli, kale, spinach, cabbage, etc.

  • certain fruits: peaches, pears, and strawberries

  • beverages: coffee, green tea, and alcohol — these beverages may irritate your thyroid gland

 

Monday

breakfast: toast with eggs

lunch: chicken salad with 2–3 Brazil nuts

dinner: stir-fried chicken and vegetables served with rice

 

Tuesday

breakfast: oatmeal with 1/4 cup (31 grams) of berries

lunch: grilled salmon salad

dinner: fish baked with lemon, thyme, and black pepper served with steamed vegetables

 

Wednesday

breakfast: toast with eggs

lunch: leftovers from dinner

dinner: shrimp skewers served with a quinoa salad

 

Thursday

breakfast: overnight chia pudding — 2 tbsp (28 grams) of chia seeds, 1 cup (240 ml) of Greek yogurt, 1/2 tsp of vanilla extract, and sliced fruits of your choice. Let sit in a bowl or mason jar overnight

lunch: leftovers from dinner

dinner: roast lamb served with steamed vegetables

 

Friday

breakfast: banana-berry smoothie

lunch: chicken salad sandwich

dinner: pork fajitas — sliced lean pork, bell peppers, and salsa — served in corn tortillas

 

Saturday

breakfast: egg, mushroom, and zucchini frittata

lunch: tuna and boiled egg salad

dinner: homemade Mediterranean pizza topped with tomato paste, olives, and feta cheese

 

Sunday

breakfast: omelet with various vegetables

lunch: quinoa salad with green vegetables and nuts

dinner: grilled steak with a side salad

 

Foods to eat if you have hyperthyroidism:

Low-iodine foods: The mineral iodine plays a key role in making thyroid hormones. A low-iodine diet helps to reduce thyroid hormones.

Add these foods to your daily diet:

non-iodized salt

coffee or tea (without milk or dairy- or soy-based creamers)

egg whites

fresh or canned fruit

unsalted nuts and nut butters

homemade bread or breads made without salt, dairy, and eggs

popcorn with non-iodized salt

oats

potatoes

honey

maple syrup

 

Vitamins and minerals

Several nutrients are essential for thyroid health and to balance thyroid hormone production.

Iron, selenium, zinc, calcium, vitamin D

 

Foods to avoid if you have hyperthyroidism

Excess iodine, nitrates, gluten, soy, caffeine.

 

******Most dietary restrictions will be temporary. *****

 

Medical Nutrition Therapy:

Gastrointestinal Distress

Management Strategies for Abdominal Bloating and Distension

Bloating and distension are among the most common gastrointestinal complaints reported by patients with functional gut disorders and by the general population.

 

The treatment of bloating has been notoriously difficult. However, now that the pathophysiologic mechanisms are better understood, several therapies directed at contributing factors have improved the ability to achieve symptom reduction, if not resolution.

Diet

The most significant advance in the treatment of bloating has been the identification of a group of poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates (FODMAPs). This term brings together carbohydrate subtypes with similar properties— fructo-oligosaccharides (fructans), galacto-oligosaccharides, lactose, fructose, sorbitol, and mannitol. All of these are of small molecular size and, thus, are osmotically active, and they always are or have the potential to be poorly absorbed or slowly absorbed in the human small intestine.

Prosecretory and Promotility Agents

Prosecretory and promotility agents, such as linaclotide (Linzess, Forest Laboratories/Ironwood Pharmaceuticals), prucalopride, and lubiprostone (Amitiza, Sucampo/Takeda), are emerging as safe and efficacious treatments for chronic constipation and IBS-C.

Antidepressants

Current guidelines77 support the use of antidepressants for IBS, but the data on the reduction of bloating are less clear. Selective serotonin receptor inhibitors (SSRIs) are gaining favor over tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) because of their better side effect profile. Data suggest that SSRIs do improve quality of life, but they do not appear to have a consistently positive effect on bloating

Probiotics

A systematic review concluded that bloating is significantly reduced by the probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis 35624.

 

Medical Nutrition Therapy:

IBS-C/ D

Start a LOW FODMAP diet to see if this relieves your GI symptoms.

 

*PLEASE NOTE, this is usually a diet I recommend for lower gastrointestinal relief of symptoms such as diarrhea and constipation (IBS-C/D) but the low-FODMAP diet is the most effective treatment option for managing bloating to date so I think it’s a great idea to TRIAL THE DIET.

Down load this APP for help:

Management Strategies for Gastrointestinal Distress, Abdominal Bloating and Distension

Bloating and distension are among the most common gastrointestinal complaints reported by patients with functional gut disorders and by the general population.

 

The treatment of bloating has been notoriously difficult. However, now that the pathophysiologic mechanisms are better understood, several therapies directed at contributing factors have improved the ability to achieve symptom reduction, if not resolution.

Diet

The most significant advance in the treatment of bloating has been the identification of a group of poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates (FODMAPs). This term brings together carbohydrate subtypes with similar properties— fructo-oligosaccharides (fructans), galacto-oligosaccharides, lactose, fructose, sorbitol, and mannitol. All of these are of small molecular size and, thus, are osmotically active, and they always are or have the potential to be poorly absorbed or slowly absorbed in the human small intestine.

You'll eliminate all FODMAPs only until you feel better (about 2 to 4 weeks). Then, you'll slowly test each FODMAP group to figure out which groups are your triggers (about 6 to 8 weeks). After that, you'll know which FODMAPs to avoid or limit (these are your triggers), and which are well tolerated.

I have attached a guide to the FODMAP DIET for you to review and start.

LOW FODMAP SNACK Recommendations

 

Snyder’s gluten free pretzels

Rice crackers

Potato chips (avoid flavored, choose simply salted)

Smart puffs or Pirates Booty

Tortilla chips (plain)

Peanut butter Go Macro bar

Ginny Bakes Chocolate Chip Love (full size or minis)

Laiki crackers (red or black rice crackers)

Aleias Almond Horns

 

These choices are wheat free, dairy free and are Low FODMAP when eaten in recommended portion sizes.

Siete- Grain Free Tortilla Chips

Siete- Grain Free Tortilla Chips No Salt with Avocado Oil

Himalayan Pink Salt- Popcorn

Himalayan Pink Salt- Paleo Puffs

Terra Chips- Sweet Potato Sea Salt

365 Everyday Value- Sesame Rice Crackers

Lundberg- Brown Rice, Organic Rice Cakes

Biena- Chickpeas Snacks, Sea Salt

Barnana- Himalayan Pink Sea Salt Organic Ridged Plantain Chips

Go Raw- Sprouted Pumpkin

GoMacro bar- Organic Protein Replenishment Peanut Butter

Bobos- Coconut Oat Bar

Bobos- Chocolate Chip Oat Bar

Square Organics- Organic Chocolate Coated Crunch

Square Organics- Organic Cocoa Coconut Bar

Blue Mountain - Almond Nut Thins

The following proteins have been lab tested and certified low FODMAP by Monash University or FODMAP Friendly either as standalone ingredients or are used in commercially prepared products.

 

Please refer to Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for serving size amounts and/or the products that these items appear within:

Casein

Egg Protein

Fenuflakes (high protein-high fiber, low fat-ultra low carb derived from fenugreek seeds)

Hemp Protein

Milk Protein Isolate

Pea Protein

Pea Protein Isolate

Pumpkin Seed Protein

Rice Protein

Sacha Inchi Protein

Soy Protein Isolate

Sprouted Brown Rice Protein

Sunflower Protein

Whey protein concentrate

Whey protein isolate

Casa de Santé Vegan Protein in Vanilla

Casa de Santé Advanced Whey Protein– Vanilla & Chocolate

Musclegen Performance Nutrition Genepro Medical Grade Protein

OWYN Cold Brew Coffee Protein Drink

OWYN Cookies n’ Cream Protein Drink

OWYN Dark Chocolate Protein Drink

OWYN Turmeric Golden Mylk Protein Drink

OWYN Vanilla Protein Drink

OWYN Strawberry Banana Protein Drink

Stellar Lab Whey Protein Shake- Vanilla, Chocolate & Salted Caramel

Stellar Lab Raw Vegan Plant Protein Shakes – Vanilla & Chocolate

Three Arrows Collagen Peptides

 

Additional Products To Try

About Time Whey Protein Isolate – Unflavored

Ancient Nutrition Bone Broth Protein Powder – Pure Flavor and Turmeric

BioChem 100% Whey Protein – Vanilla and Natural

BiPro Whey Protein Isolate – Unflavored

Bob’s Red Mill Pea Protein Powder

BOOST High Protein Complete Nutrition Drink – Rich Chocolate, Very Vanilla, and Creamy Strawberry

Boost Optimum Advanced Nutrition Drink – Rich Chocolate and Creamy Vanilla

BOOST Essential Unflavored Protein Powder

EAS AdvantEDGE Carb Control Shakes – Vanilla and Rich Dark Chocolate

Ensure Original Nutrition Shake – Milk Chocolate, Vanilla, Strawberry, Dark Chocolate, Butter Pecan, Coffee Latte, and Banana Nut

Ensure High Protein Nutrition Shake – Milk Chocolate, Vanilla, and Strawberry

Ensure Plus Nutrition Shake – Milk Chocolate, Vanilla, Strawberry, Dark Chocolate, and Butter Pecan

Evolve Real Plant – Powered Protein Shake – Ideal Vanilla, Classic Chocolate, and Mellow Mocha

Fairlife Core Power Elite – Chocolate and Vanilla 42G

Further Food Collagen Peptides Protein Powder– Unflavored

Growing Naturals Organic Rice Protein – Original and Strawberry

Growing Naturals Pea Protein Powder – Original, Vanilla, Chocolate and Strawberry

Isopure Zero Carb Protein Powder, 100% Whey Protein Isolate – Unflavored

Jarrow Brown Rice – Vanilla and Chocolate

Jarrow Formulas Virgin Whey Protein Isolate– Unflavored

Jay Robb Egg White Protein – Unflavored

Jay Robb Whey Protein Isolate – Unflavored, Vanilla and Chocolate

Life Extension Whey Protein Isolate– Natural Vanilla Flavor

Left Coast Performance Bone Broth Protein Powder – Original

Naked Pea Protein – Unflavored, Vanilla and Chocolate

Naked Rice Organic Brown Rice Protein Powder

Nature’s Best Isopure Zero Carb Protein Powder, 100% Whey Protein Isolate – Unflavored

NOW Sports Egg White Protein Powder

NOW Sports Pea Protein Powder

Nutribiotic Brown Rice Protein-Plain – Vanilla and Chocolate

Nutrabio 100% Hydrolyzed Whey Protein– Unflavored

Organic Valley Organic Balance Milk Protein Shake – Dark Chocolate

Organic Valley Organic Fuel High Protein Milk Shake – Vanilla

Paleo Thin Protein Egg White Powder

PreProtein Whey Protein Isolate

PBfit All-Natural Peanut Butter Powder

Sports Research Collagen Peptides

Trader Joe’s Organic Pea Protein – Unflavored

Unjury Planted Pea Protein– Unflavored

Unjury Whey Protein Powder– Unflavored

 
 

*** = Vegan 

 

Breakfast 

Yogurt 

  • Fage Total 0% Greek Yogurt 

  • Icelandic Provisions, Vanilla Skyr

  • Sigi’s Icelandic Style Strained NF Yogurt 

  • Chobani Non-Fat Plain Yogurt 

  • Stonyfield Organic Greek Yogurt, Plain 

  • Kite Hill Plain Almond Milk Yogurt **

  • Silk Almond Milk Yogurt **

  • Sigi’s Plant Based Coconut Blend Yogurt **

  • Lava Plant Based Yogurt **

  • Ripple Yogurt Alternative **

  • Forager Project Unsweetened Plain Yogurt **

  • Nancy’s Plain Oatmilk Yogurt **

  • So Delicious Unsweetened Coconut Yogurt **

Granola & Cereals 

  • Kashi Cereal **

  • Purely Elizabth Granola **

  • Fiber One Cereal **

  • Original Cheerios **

  • Grape nuts **

  • KIND: Healthy Grains **

  • Nature’s Path: Millet Rice, Mesa Sunrise, Organic Flax PLus Multigrain Flakes **

Oats 

  • Nature’s Path Oats or Instant Oats 

  • Kodiak 

  • Purely ELizabeth Oats 

  • Quaker Original Whole Oats 

  • 365 Organic Original 

  • Red Mill 

  • McCann's Steel Cut Irish Oatmeal

Gluten Free Brands 

  • BFree Brown Seeded Sandwich Bread 

  • Three Bakers Golden FLax Bread 

  • Udi’s 

  • Canyon Bakehouse 

  • Healthy Camper Hemp Hemp Hooray 

  • Little Northern Bakehouse Seeds and Grains 

  • Schar Multigrain Ciabatta 

Whole Grain Breads

  • Ezekial 

  • Dave’s Killer Bread 

  • Thomas Whole Grain English Muffin 

Vegan Egg Substitutes 

The Vegg Power Scramble **

  • JUST Egg, Folded and Scramble **

  • Follow Your Heart, Vegan Egg **

  • The Neat Egg **

     

Lunch

Salad Kits

  • Taylor farms

  • Off brand or grocery store kits 

Whole Grains 

  • Ancient Grains Quinoa with Chickpeas 

  • Simple Truth Grain mixes 

  • Simply Nature 90 Second Organic Seven Grains Blend 

  • Kirkland Organic Ancient Grain Blend 

  • Seeds of Change Quinoa, Brown and Rice with Flaxseed

  • Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Brown Rice 

  • Minute Ready to Serve! Organic Brown Rice 

Breads & Wraps 

 

Dinner Vegetables: raw, grilled, baked, frozen or steamable bags 

  • Salad kits 

  • Dark leafy greens: Kale & Spinach 

  • Broccoli 

  • Asparagus 

  • Brussel sprouts 

  • Mixed bell peppers

  • Carrots 

Dinner Protein 

Tofu **

  • Trader Joe’s Sprouted Organic Tofu 

  • House Foods Organic Tofu 

  • Simple Truth Organic Tofu 

  • Nasoya Organic Tofu 

  • 365 Organic Tofu 

Tempeh **

  • LightLife Organic Tempeh 

  • Franklin Farms 

Beans - Organic, Low sodium 

Meat Alternative Brands

  • Dr. Praeger's All American Veggie Burger 

  • MorningStar Farms Veggie Burger 

  • BOCA

  • Hilary’s Organic 

  • Amy’s Organic 

     

Health(ier*) chips, crisps, popcorn and crackers

  • Popcorners ( regular chips OR** popcorners flex protein chips)

  • Beanitos White or Black Bean Chips

  • Baked Ruffles Cheddar and Sour Cream Potato Chips

  • Sea Salt Pop Chips

  • Buddha Bowl Avocado-Licious Popcorn

  • Mary's Gone Crackers (Super Seed Everything)

  • Way Better Snacks Black Bean Tortilla Chips

  • Harvest Snaps Snapea Crisps

  • Simple Mills almond flour crackers

  • Bare Veggie Chips

  • Saffron Road Baked Lentil Chips

  • Simple Mills Rosemary & Sea Salt Almond Flour Crackers

  • Ozery Bakery Lavash Crackers, Multi-Grain and Seeds 

  • Nabisco Triscuit Baked Whole Grain Wheat Original 

  • Wasa Crispbread Fiber

  • CrunchMaster Multi-Grain Sea Salt 

  • Rhythm Superfoods Beet Chips

  • HIPPEAS Organic Chickpea Puffs 

  • Seapoint Farms Dry Roasted Edamame 

  • Saffron Road Roasted Chickpeas
     

Protein snack ideas: 

  • Greek yogurt + Granola 

  • Cottage cheese + Fruit 

  • Cheese stick + crackers 

  • Mixed nuts + Fruit 

  • Peanut butter/ Almond Butter + fruit or crackers 

  • Protein shake 

  • Protein bar 
     

Vegan Meal Idea: 

  •  Yogurt Alternative of choice + ¼ cup Julian’s Bakery ProGranola® Vanilla Cinnamon Cluster on top (21 grams protein, 150 calories) OR piece of fruit + ¼ cup granola  + 2 Tbsp nut mix (almonds, cashews, pumpkin seeds, hemp hearts)

  • Lunch: Salad + lentils/ beans + 1 tbsp mixed nuts

  • Snack: ONE, NuGo, or Julian’s Bakery Pegan Protein Bar (20 grams, 200 calories)

  • Dinner: 30 g protein

  • Post-dinner dessert: Vegan protein powder or Casein protein shake (if you can tolerate the dairy) OR yogurt and granola (25 grams, 150 calories)

 

 

Sweet Treat! 

  • Low sugar, high fiber cereal that can be added to dark chocolate caco nibs + unsalted popcorn or crunched up rice cakes (like the dark chocolate ones) + unsweetened coconut chips + maybe some dried fruit (craisins/ raisins)

  • Greek yogurt or Yogurt Alternative with toppings 

  • Peanut butter + Chocolate Chips 

  • Overnight Oats with scoop of Protein Powder 
     

EASY PROTEIN OPTIONS

  •  Pre-made hard-boiled eggs

  •  Whey or Vegan protein bars

  •  Low-fat cottage cheese

  •  String cheese

  •  Shelf-stable chocolate milk/protein shakes

  •  Greek yogurt

  •  Protein powder

  •  Milk/soy milk

  •  Beans

  • Mixed nuts 
     

 Vegetarian Protein Powder Suggestions:

  • Garden Of Life Sport Organic Plant-Based Protein (Per serving: 170 calories, 3 g fat (1 g sat), 7 g carbs, 1 g sugar, 4 g fiber, 180 mg sodium, 30 g protein)

  • Ripple Pure Plant Protein Powder (Per serving: 110 calories, 2 g fat (0.5 g sat), 4 g carbs, 0 g sugar, 2 g fiber, 390 mg sodium, 20 g protein)

  • Ora So Lean & So Clean Organic Plant-Based Protein (Per serving: 130 calories, 3 g fat (0.5 g sat), 5 g carbs, 0 g sugar, 1.8 g fiber, 390 mg sodium, 22 g protein )

  • Garden of Life Raw Organic Protein (Per serving: 110 calories, 2.5 g fat (0 g sat), 2 g carbs, 0 g sugar, 1 g fiber, 180 mg sodium, 22 g protein)

  • NOW Foods Plant Protein Complex (Per serving: 140 calories, 2 g fat (0 g sat), 7 g carbs, 0 g sugar, 300 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 22 g protein)

  • Health Warrior Superfood Protein + Probiotics (Per serving: 120 calories, 1 g fat (0 g sat), 8 g carbs, 1 g sugar, 90 mg sodium, 25 g fiber, 20 g protein)

  • ALOHA Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder (Per serving: 150 calories, 3 g fat (0 g sat), 15 g carbs, 11 g sugar, 150 mg sodium, 2 g fiber, 18 g protein)

  • Vega Sport Premium Protein (Per serving: 160 calories, 3 g fat (0 g sat), 4 g carbs, 1 g sugar, 410 mg sodium, 1 g fiber, 30 g protein)

  • Kura Nutrition Plant-Based Vegan Wellness Powder (Per serving: 130 calories, 2 g fat (1 g sat), 12 g carbs, 3 g sugar, 310 mg sodium, 6 g fiber, 15 g protein)

  • Orgain Organic Protein & Chia Seeds Protein Powder (Per serving: 170 calories, 5 g fat (0 g sat), 21 g carbs, 1 g sugar, 310 mg sodium, 8 g fiber, 21 g protein)

  • Amazing Grass Organic Protein Superfood (Per serving: 120 calories, 2.5 g fat (0 g sat), 6 g carbs, <1 g sugar, 250 mg sodium, 4 g fiber, 20 g protein)

  • Plant Fusion Complete Plant-Based Protein (Per serving: 120 calories, 3 g fat (0 g sat), 2 g carbs, 0 g sugar, 390 mg sodium, <1 g fiber, 21 g protein)
     

Protein Bars

  • PURE PROTEIN, DELUX CHOCOLATE (21g protein, 180 calories)

  • NAKED BAR (15 g protein, 210 calories)

  • ONE BAR (20 g protein, 230 calories)

    • ONE BAR PlANT **

  • PRIMAL THIN, JULIAN BAKERY (20 g protein, 130 calories)

  • THINK! (20 g protein, 240 calories)

  • RX BAR (12 g protein, 170 calories)

  • GO MACRO **

  • KIND Breakfast Protein **

  • LARA BAR PROTEIN **

  • Garden of Life SPORT Performance Protein Bar **

  • Plant Based Vega Protein Bar **

 

Breakfast 

Yogurt 

  • Fage Total 0% Greek Yogurt 

  • Icelandic Provisions, Vanilla Skyr

  • Sigi’s Icelandic Style Strained NF Yogurt 

  • Chobani Non-Fat Plain Yogurt 

  • Stonyfield Organic Greek Yogurt, Plain 

Granola & Cereals 

  • Kashi Cereal 

  • Purely Elizabth Granola 

  • Fiber One Cereal 

  • Original Cheerios 

  • Grape nuts 

  • KIND: Healthy Grains 

  • Nature’s Path: Millet Rice, Mesa Sunrise, Organic Flax PLus Multigrain Flakes 

Oats 

  • Nature’s Path Oats or Instant Oats 

  • Kodiak 

  • Purely ELizabeth Oats 

  • Quaker Original Whole Oats 

  • 365 Organic Original 

  • Red Mill 

  • McCann's Steel Cut Irish Oatmeal

Gluten Free Brands 

  • BFree Brown Seeded Sandwich Bread 

  • Three Bakers Golden FLax Bread 

  • Udi’s 

  • Canyon Bakehouse 

  • Healthy Camper Hemp Hemp Hooray 

  • Little Northern Bakehouse Seeds and Grains 

  • Schar Multigrain Ciabatta 

Whole Grain Breads

  • Ezekial 

  • Dave’s Killer Bread 

  • Thomas Whole Grain English Muffin

 

Lunch

Salad Kits

  • Taylor farms

  • Off brand or grocery store kits 

Whole Grains 

  • Ancient Grains Quinoa with Chickpeas 

  • Simple Truth Grain mixes 

  • Simply Nature 90 Second Organic Seven Grains Blend 

  • Kirkland Organic Ancient Grain Blend 

  • Seeds of Change Quinoa, Brown and Rice with Flaxseed

  • Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Brown Rice 

  • Minute Ready to Serve! Organic Brown Rice 
     

Dinner Vegetables: raw, grilled, baked, frozen or steamable bags 

  • Salad kits 

  • Dark leafy greens: Kale & Spinach 

  • Broccoli 

  • Asparagus 

  • Brussel sprouts 

  • Mixed bell peppers

  • Carrots 

Dinner Proteins

  • Chicken 

  • Turkey or Turkey Loin 

  • Lean Beef 

  • Pork Loin

  • Seafood, Salmon, Tuna, White Fish, Shrimp 

  • Tofu & Tempeh

 

Health(ier*) chips, crisps, popcorn and crackers

  • Popcorners ( regular chips OR** popcorners flex protein chips)

  • Beanitos White or Black Bean Chips

  • Baked Ruffles Cheddar and Sour Cream Potato Chips

  • Sea Salt Pop Chips

  • Buddha Bowl Avocado-Licious Popcorn

  • Mary's Gone Crackers (Super Seed Everything)

  • Way Better Snacks Black Bean Tortilla Chips

  • Harvest Snaps Snapea Crisps

  • Simple Mills almond flour crackers

  • Bare Veggie Chips

  • Saffron Road Baked Lentil Chips

  • Simple Mills Rosemary & Sea Salt Almond Flour Crackers

  • Ozery Bakery Lavash Crackers, Multi-Grain and Seeds 

  • Nabisco Triscuit Baked Whole Grain Wheat Original 

  • Wasa Crispbread Fiber

  • CrunchMaster Multi-Grain Sea Salt 

  • Rhythm Superfoods Beet Chips

  • HIPPEAS Organic Chickpea Puffs 

  • Seapoint Farms Dry Roasted Edamame 

  • Saffron Road Roasted Chickpeas
     

Protein snack ideas: 

  • Greek yogurt + Granola 

  • Cottage cheese + Fruit 

  • Cheese stick + crackers 

  • Mixed nuts + Fruit 

  • Peanut butter/ Almond Butter + fruit or crackers 

  • Protein shake 

  • Protein bar 

  • Jerky 
     

Sweet Treat

  • Low sugar, high fiber cereal that can be added to dark chocolate caco nibs + unsalted popcorn or crunched up rice cakes (like the dark chocolate ones) + unsweetened coconut chips + maybe some dried fruit (craisins/ raisins)

  • Greek yogurt with toppings 

  • Peanut butter + Chocolate Chips 

  • Overnight oats with scoop of protein powder 
     

EASY PROTEIN OPTIONS

  •  Tuna pouches

  •  Pre-cooked chicken breasts

  •  Pre-made hard-boiled eggs

  •  Whey protein bars

  •  Low-fat cottage cheese

  •  Deli meat (turkey, ham or roast beef)

  •  String cheese

  •  Jerky

  •  Shelf-stable chocolate milk/protein shakes

  •  Greek yogurt

  •  Protein powder

  •  Milk/soy milk

  •  Beans
     

Protein Powder

  • Ascent whey and casein

  • Klean Athlete whey

  • NAKED Whey, Garden of Life Chocolate Sport Whey

  • PURE protein, PREMIER Protein

  • EAS by Abbott protein shake

  • Ideal Lean

  •  NOW Sports egg white protein
     

PROTEIN BAR Recommendations

  • PURE PROTEIN, DELUX CHOCOLATE (21g protein, 180 calories)

  • NAKED BAR (15 g protein, 210 calories)

  • EPIC JERKY (15 g protein, 100 calories)

  • ONE BAR (20 g protein, 230 calories)

  • PRIMAL THIN, JULIAN BAKERY (20 g protein, 130 calories)

  • THINK! (20 g protein, 240 calories)

  • RX BAR (12 g protein, 170 calories)

  • NUTS' N MORE PROTEIN POUCH (11 g protein, 180 calories)


​GRANOLA BAR Recommendations

  • Kashi Chewy Granola Bars Chocolate Almond with Sea Salt and Granola

  • Kashi GOLEAN Salted Dark Chocolate & Nuts Fiber and Protein Bars

  • LUNA Salted Caramel Cashew

  • Annie's Homegrown Gluten-Free Oatmeal Cookie Granola Bars

  • Health Warrior Chia Bars

  • This Bar Saves Lives. Madagascar Vanilla Almond & Honey

Recc for hydration:

  •  Vitamin Water

  •  La Croix, Seltzer Waters

  • Club Soda

  •  NUUN tablets 

  • Ultima powder

  • Mix half of water with half Propel, Gatorade, Juice, Sweet Tea 

  • Have a straw water bottle that you enjoy

 

THE BASICS- Food it FUEL- Make your food work for you!

 

If you follow these simple guidelines, you will improve your athletic performance.

 

EAT at the right times. Maximize your energy stores and your performance by taking in carbohydrate and protein foods every 3-4 hours during the day (I’ll outline this for you in a sample meal plan)

 

EAT the right foods. Carbohydrates are your major source of fuel. They fuel your muscles for performance. Athletes need high quality carbohydrates throughout the day to maintain energy stores. Without plenty of carbohydrate, you will feel fatigued and will not be able to perform at your best on the field or in the classroom.

 

EAT high quality (hq) protein. Consume hq protein throughout the day like chicken, fish, turkey, egg, tofu, beans, low-fat dairy, and lean beef (top round, sirloin, filet).

 

DRINK plenty of fluids. Dehydration causes fatigue, cramping, and a decrease in performance. Drink water, milk, juice and sport drink at regular intervals throughout the day.

 

LIMIT fat intake. Fat is a necessary part of a healthy diet. However, fat takes a long time to break down and be converted to energy. So, moderating your fat intake (especially around training and competing times) will help you perform better.

 

Make WEIGHT CHANGES in the off season. Eating too few calories can decrease your metabolism, decrease your strength, and be detrimental to your performance. If you need to lose body fat, consult your sports nutritionist (or this manual) for an eating plan to suit your needs.

 

Be AWARE. Media presents a picture that the “average American” needs to cut back on food/carbs/fat. You are not “average”. As an athlete your needs are unique and exceed the needs of other non-athletes. Don’t follow the masses, take care of your needs as a student athlete, commit to fueling your body!

 

Use your SUPPORT As a student athlete you have a lot of support around performance; coaches, team doctor, athletic trainer, strength and conditioning coach, sport nutritionist, among many others. Being a student athlete requires dedication, inspiration and a lot of hard work. Your “team” is there to help you!!

How many calories do I need?

Calorie needs vary from athlete to athlete and from day to day. You may have a higher metabolism and that increases your needs. Caloric needs should be met with high-energy, nutrient dense foods from various macronutrient groups.

CARBOHYDRATES: The ENERGY Provider

Carbs are an athlete’s primary source of energy. They provide working muscles the energy they need to jump, run, lift and swim. High performance athletes must make sure they are taking in plenty of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are stored in the muscle and the liver as glycogen; like an internal storage locker for energy! Your glycogen stores will be depleted during workouts and must be replenished. If you forget to replace your glycogen stores, you will not have enough energy the next day; scary if it is your game day! 50-70% of your energy should come from carbohydrates.

PROTEIN, PROTEIN, PROTEIN!

PROTEINS: The Muscle Re-Builder

What are they for? Proteins help re-build and repair the body’s tissues. Muscle tissue depends on protein to repair the damage done during exercise. Most people get more than enough protein from the food they eat. High quality, lean choices of meat/protein are listed below. Making lean choices will provide you with the ingredients you need for re-building your muscle. Each ounce of meat will provide you with approximately 7 grams of protein (ex. 4 ounces of chicken breast = 28 grams of protein).

 

POWER-TO-WEIGHT RATIO

 

Your performance relies on your power-to-weight ratio. The amount of skeletal muscle strength you have that can generate power per lb pf body weight. Body Composition is KEY for strength, endurance, speed, mobility, flexibility and agility.

 

A healthy* athlete’s Body Fat %: 17-30%

 

Protein will keep you satiated, curb any sweet or salty cravings you may have, and will help to build, repair, and maintain lean muscle mass. Get in as close to 25-30g EVERY meal you eat and at least 10-15 g at snacks.

 

You will not get stronger by eating extra protein. Consuming adequate amounts of protein along with enough calories to support your training will allow you to optimize your strength. Amino acid pills and muscle mass building powders are a waste of your money and are not adequately regulated to maintain safety.

FAT: Essential, but in moderation

What is FAT for?

Fat performs a variety of functions in the body. It is an energy source, transports fat soluble vitamins, protects our organs and also provides an ingredient to make hormones. A performance enhancing diet should contain 15-30% of total calorie intake

 

HYDRATION

 

Breast milk is about 90% water. Although research has found that nursing mothers do not need to drink more fluids than what's necessary to satisfy their thirst, experts recommend about 128 ounces per day (16 cups/ day).

Institute of Medicine notes that the median amount of fluids typically consumed by breastfeeding mothers is 3.1 liters (13 cups)

 

• Hydration is cumulative, so make it a daily focus.

• Minimum fluid needs equal half of your body weight in ounces (e.g., 150 lbs. = 75 oz. of fluid minimum).

 

Recommendations for hydration electrolyte tablets: NUUN tablets, Ultima drink powder

- Sparkling water and naturally sweetened sodas (La Croix, Spindrift, Zevia, Fizzy Lizzy, GuS, REEDs Ginger, Hansens, IZZE, Blue Sky), Iced Tea (unsweetened), Honest Tea (unsweetened), Coconut Water, Kombucha (fermented green tea)

 

Remember, the better hydrated you are, the more regular your bathroom habits will be, the less fatigue you’ll feel, and the better your immunity system!

 

DIASTASIS RECTI

HYDRATION

 

Breast milk is about 90% water. Although research has found that nursing mothers do not need to drink more fluids than what's necessary to satisfy their thirst, experts recommend about 128 ounces per day (16 cups/ day).

Institute of Medicine notes that the median amount of fluids typically consumed by breastfeeding mothers is 3.1 liters (13 cups)

 

• Hydration is cumulative, so make it a daily focus.

• Minimum fluid needs equal half of your body weight in ounces (e.g., 150 lbs. = 75 oz. of fluid minimum).

 

Recommendations for hydration electrolyte tablets: NUUN tablets, Ultima drink powder

- Sparkling water and naturally sweetened sodas (La Croix, Spindrift, Zevia, Fizzy Lizzy, GuS, REEDs Ginger, Hansens, IZZE, Blue Sky), Iced Tea (unsweetened), Honest Tea (unsweetened), Coconut Water, Kombucha (fermented green tea)

 

Remember, the better hydrated you are, the more regular your bathroom habits will be, the less fatigue you’ll feel, and the better your immunity system!

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